llaurasim:

With the end of my freshman year in sight, it is impossible to say exactly how much I have grown, learned, and really, changed over the course of the past year. I can’t and won’t even begin to reflect wholly on my first year just yet, because I don’t think I have the current emotional capacity…

It’s already been almost a whole year and a half since I first wrote this. I barely remember doing so.

💐☺️🌳 walks around occom ~

💐☺️🌳 walks around occom ~

Tiny little strawberries 😘😘

Tiny little strawberries 😘😘

Logo draft 4: Any suggestions on how to even out the placing of the words? It seems a little top heavy. #thisdartmouthlife

Logo draft 4: Any suggestions on how to even out the placing of the words? It seems a little top heavy. #thisdartmouthlife

I LIKE DIS DESKTOP OK 

I LIKE DIS DESKTOP OK 

"

I’ve said this before and I’ll point it out again -

Menstruation is caused by change in hormonal levels to stop the creation of a uterine lining and encourage the body to flush the lining out. The body does this by lowering estrogen levels and raising testosterone.

Or, to put it more plainly “That time of the month” is when female hormones most closely resemble male hormones. So if (cis) women aren’t suited to office at “That time of the month” then (cis) men are NEVER suited to office.

If you are a dude and don’t dig the ladies around you at their time of the month, just think! That is you all of the time.

And, on a final note, post-menopausal (cis) women are the most hormonally stable of all human demographics. They have fewer hormonal fluctuations of anyone, meaning older women like Hilary Clinton and Elizabeth Warren would theoretically be among the least likely candidates to make an irrational decision due to hormonal fluctuations, and if we were basing our leadership decisions on hormone levels, then only women over fifty should ever be allowed to hold office.

"

timemachineyeah (via ask-pauli-amorous)

Eat THAT, hormone-snipers!

(via tamorapierce)

(via psychoneurogenesis)

npr:

Whitman Wilcox V attended kindergarten through second grade at a neighborhood public school in the Lower Ninth Ward. He had just started the third grade when Hurricane Katrina hit in August 2005. His family was forced to evacuate; he wound up at a Catholic school in Houston.
Back in New Orleans the next fall, he switched to a brand-new charter school, KIPP Believe, for fifth through 8th grade; started high school at another charter school, Sci Academy; then was homeschooled for a year.
Now, he’s beginning his senior year of high school. This time at St. Augustine, an all-boys Catholic school famed throughout the region for its marching band.
Five schools in nine years. A generation of children who’ve lived through the storm and recovery have traced educational odysseys like this one.
Q&A: One Student’s Educational Saga In New Orleans
Photo credit: Edmund D. Fountain for NPR

npr:

Whitman Wilcox V attended kindergarten through second grade at a neighborhood public school in the Lower Ninth Ward. He had just started the third grade when Hurricane Katrina hit in August 2005. His family was forced to evacuate; he wound up at a Catholic school in Houston.

Back in New Orleans the next fall, he switched to a brand-new charter school, KIPP Believe, for fifth through 8th grade; started high school at another charter school, Sci Academy; then was homeschooled for a year.

Now, he’s beginning his senior year of high school. This time at St. Augustine, an all-boys Catholic school famed throughout the region for its marching band.

Five schools in nine years. A generation of children who’ve lived through the storm and recovery have traced educational odysseys like this one.

Q&A: One Student’s Educational Saga In New Orleans

Photo credit: Edmund D. Fountain for NPR

Playing around with starting points for logos with the lovely graphic designer! 

Playing around with starting points for logos with the lovely graphic designer! 

"An estimated 63 percent of young men between the ages of 11 and 20 who are imprisoned for homicide have killed their mothers’ batterers."

— Kimberle Crenshaw, in her article Intersectionality and Identity Politics: Learning from Violence Against Women of Color (via conjecturesandconversations)

(via republicansandtampons)

How good it feels to work on something obsessively, relentlessly, poetically. 

When I return to school, I will chop off all my hair in my bedroom with scissors bought at the local CVS.

I am having a moment right now.

I am tired of validating myself with expensive clothes I can’t afford and tired, conventional notions of beauty. I feel this disconnect.


I need to feel something else.

"I’ve experienced firsthand how the “model minority” narrative– this strange tendency to assume that Asians are simply a quiet, high-achieving community tagging along with our white brethren into a melting pot of joy–effectively de-legitimizes our voices in conversations about promoting racial justice. Leaving our voices and experiences out of the fight for racial justice erases our long, often tragic history in this country and homogenizes all Asians into one, high-achieving blob. Leaving us out means turning a blind eye to the fact that 1 in 6 Filipino-Americans and 1 in 4 Korean-Americans are undocumented, that Southeast Asians have the highest high school dropout rates in the country, that Asian American students are the most bullied ethnic group in classrooms, and that Asian women are consistently hypersexualized, objectified, and orientalized via widespread media representations. If you choose not to include us in discussions on racial justice, you are telling us that our struggles don’t matter."

— Linsey Yoo, Racialicious, "Solidarity is for white women and Asian people are funny" (via owning-my-truth)

(via bijouxed)

I love you, Garrett Borns.

I love you, Garrett Borns.

Unreal. Yuna in concert with @polyesther321 🌙

Unreal. Yuna in concert with @polyesther321 🌙